Grilling Sockeye Salmon: Wild Alaskan Seafood at Its Best

All Alaska Salmon Species - ASMIAlaska is fortunate have five species of Pacific salmon that call it home. These species of include the King or Chinook, Sockeye or Red, Coho or Silver, Chum or Keta and Pink salmon. Each has its place and preference among Alaskans. Sockeye salmon are prized by Alaska residents for their flavor and abundance. Having high oil content, Sockeyes have a unique rich favor and deep red flesh that stays bright during cooking. Salmon are not among the largest of Alaskan salmon, averaging about six pounds in weight, with fillets coming in at around a pound and a half. Grilling sockeye salmon is wild Alaskan seafood at its best.

Learn to grill salmon and other directly on the barbeque grate. Keep the grill’s temperature at moderate 375º Fahrenheit and spray the barbeque grate with a non-stick cooking spray.

Marinate fully cut, skin-on Sockeye fillets in Yoshida’s Gourmet Sauce for about 15 minutes. Marinating the fish for longer periods will not provide any addition benefit. Place the fillets on the barbeque grate skin side down and carefully slide them back and forth a little in the direction of its bars. This will prevent the fish from sticking on the grill.

After about six minutes, carefully flip the fillet over and repeat the process. Try to only turn the fish over once on the grill. Cook the Sockeye until the flesh is lightly translucent at its center. Avoid over cooking, the fish will continue to cook a while after it is removed from the heat.

It is better to undercook salmon and return to the grill for a little longer to get it right, than ruin it by over cooking. Initially, most people unfamiliar with grilling fish will leave it on the heat too long.

Serve the grilled Sockeye salmon on a platter and let it set for a few minutes before serving. Sockeye grilled with the Yoshida’s Gourmet Sauce make a great presentation with their deep color and visual appeal. Grilling some Northwest asparagus alongside the salmon makes an excellent accompanying side dish.

This article was first seen at Suite101.com Copyright © 2013 by Alan Sorum

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